New Years Day

Photography

This is not a photo; it’s a document, a testament. This is the year we started out as Canadian bad asses. January 1st, 2018. Broken and bruised hearts full of hope, the way life has a way of coming at you. We came out with our bottle of whiskey, my camera, our boots. I didn’t even know how cold it was because my phone froze. -13? -14?

This is the kind of photo I might have admired from a distance. You won’t catch me out there, doing that. But there we were. Wondering about the light in the sky and the hard life of swans and other birds on a day such as this.

Shot January 1, 2018 as the sun went down.  Approximate weather at the time was recorded online as:

Temperature: -13 °C or -14°C Passing clouds. Wind: 26 km/h Humidity: 56% Barometer: 102.78 kPa Visability: 24 km

Night Reverie

Photography, The Artist's Journey

#conceptualphotography #townofajax #lakeontario #fog #mist #dreamscape #visualsoflife #artisoninstagram #lakeontario #rotarypark #canon6d #photography

I didn’t quite drop everything for the fog. Not quite. I thought I should finish this damned kitchen sink installation thing. I thought I should probably feed the kids. But the pull of the fog is a strong one. It’s hardly ever here and doesn’t last long and I’m no good at shooting it yet. And while I wouldn’t say I resented the interferences, I would say I was quietly aggravated. And when Sobeys didn’t have any more whole chickens left, damned if I was going to go grocery store hopping.

When I shoot, there is a high load of energy and anxiety in equal measure. There’s a freight train in my head and it leads me. I don’t feel the cold of my hands, the scrapes or bruises I collect, wet feet. Someone happens to me. Just one more. Just one more.

Then there is the anxiety of getting caught shooting someone’s home or a plaza security guard chasing me off, the boogey men in the night when I shoot at night (I shoot a lot at night), the jerk surprise blaring of a horn (why do people honk when they see me shooting, I don’t get it), the sudden appearance of pedestrians right behind me that I didn’t see coming. And this thing about getting back home. And taking up time. Damn, I forgot my phone! Shoot, it’s 3 in the morning already. I’m sure I’d shoot better if I was calmer.

But there is this other thing, this freight train inside, driving me, something amped up. Go. Go. It’s like increased awareness. Like heightened living. Along side of the anxiety there is this other thing. This excitement, this giddiness, this joy in the capture. And it always takes longer than I think it should and always longer thanI think it actually has. And I’m there. As present as could be. Just one more. Just one more.

It takes its toll, naturally.

After, I am completely exhausted. Physically and mentally. I don’t know what I’ve been doing with myself to be this tired. I wonder why I do it. I’m not sure why I like shooting then. Or if I actually do. Especially this night business. I like the light. I love the sun. Why do I do it? Some days I can’t even be bothered to really look at what I got beyond reviewing the images on the back of the camera. Getting the card out of the camera and putting it into the camera, starting the apps and all the seems like too big of a chore.

Later, when I have a quiet time to myself, or maybe as a treat to myself, I’ll look at the shots. This is a different thing. Like a secret thing. But calm. Measured. Like a sleuth. Sometimes, often times, there is at least one that demands my attention. It’s not always the one I think it’ll be. Sometimes it takes time to discover it. The onslaught of images to sift through sometimes causes me to overlook a diamond in the rough.

This is one of them. I remember this sequence of shots very well. The fog was starting to disappear but what was left of it was starting to settle as low lying mist. I was caught by the soften of the light. I had to get back home and I was in conflict. But I couldn’t let it go. I remember now why I shoot. I look at the disasters you’ll never see and think about what I can do better next time. I lovingly treat the images that I like even just a little. Little gems, little jewels, little gifts. Just one more. Just one more.

408 Fairall St

Photography

I wouldn’t swear to it because I got this off the internet, but I believe that this is Axalta Coating Systems which produces performance and transportation coatings. Their slogan is “Simply Brilliant”.  They are an international company with principal locations in Philadelphia, Switzerland, Pennsalvania US, Mexico, Singapore, Shanghia and have approximately 13,000 employees. Here they are quietly in Ajax, too.

They have 47 training centres around the world to help their customers get the best out of their coatings and colour tools. Ajax is one of them.

Stuff you might not have known about Ajax.

 

Railroad Crossing

Photography

I was heading toward Station Street with the intention of shooting some of the industrial buildings just south of there. It’s my favourite route to the soccer turfs. But this freight train was blocking the road. I’ve never seen a train on these tracks, but then, I’m not sure I’ve ever been down there that time of night.

It sat there for a long time.  I decided to shoot it: from the sunroof, from the window, through the windshield. What else are you going to do while you wait?

Cars that had lined up behind me eventually backed up and turned around. This allowed me to get off the road and approach the train on foot.  I waited until the train got moving again to get this. Patience can be a virtue.